Vintage Multi-Tools (Miscellaneous)

1822-blade Joseph Rodgers & Sons "Year Knife"

 
The photo of the knife was scanned from a 1983 post card. 
The advertisement from The Post Office Directory of Birmingham (1879) was digitized by Google Books.

The 1822-blade "Year Knife" is listed in the 1997 Guinness Book of World Records as the pen knife with the most blades.  It was constructed in 1822 and originally contained 1822 blades.  An additional blade was added each year.  An article in Boy's Life Aug 1926 indicates that at some time they switched to adding a blade every five years.  According to Guinness, the last blade was added in 1973.

The ad from Canadian magazine Volume 12 (1899) 
was digitized by Google Books.

References:
1997 Guinness Book of World Records



Norfolk Sportsman's Knife

Picture from Boys' Life Aug 1926 digitized by Google Books.

Mid 19th Century

References:
Levine's Guide to Knives and their Values 4th Edition, p. 298



"The Defender" Pocket Knife and Revolver

  
The photos were generously provided to The Multi-Tool Museum by D Ludwick.

  
The ad was scanned from a 1927 Johnson Smith & Co. Catalog.  The Ad from Popular mechanics magazine, Volume 30 (1918) was digitized by Google Books.

An advertisement for the "United States Small Arms Co. .22 caliber knife pistol" is shown on page 295 of 
Levine's Guide to Knives and their Values 4th Edition.  In his book, Levine notes that the knife is illegal.  

References:
Levine's Guide to Knives and their Values 4th Edition, p. 295
Bernard Levine's knife-related links page: includes links to information on knives, knife technology, knife history, and knife law. http://www.knife-expert.com/links.htm
Bernard Levine's internet business card: http://www.knife-expert.com Author, Expert Witness, Identification, Appraisal. 


Sewing Knife

The photos were generously provided to The Multi-Tool Museum by an anonymous contributor.

Sewing knife with a ribbon threaded and a pattern picker. The knife body is hollow and contains needles in two separate compartments.  The design appears to be adapted from a "fancy sleeveboard lobster" knife pattern (page 260 of Levine's Guide).  

Wade & Butcher Cutter Knife


The photos were generously provided to The Multi-Tool Museum by G.L. of New Jersey.

RD No. 715810



Morley "Radio Tool"

  
The photos were generously provided to The Multi-Tool Museum by G.L. of New Jersey.  The ad was scanned from a 1929 Hibbard, Spencer, Bartlett & Co. Catalog. 

Circa ~1915-1929. 



Remington Radio Knife

  
Ads from Popular Science April 1929 and Boys' Life December 1926 digitized by Google books. 



Emil Peters 1889 Patent Multi-Tool Scissors

References:
http://www.google.com/patents?id=duhNAAAAEBAJ


Friedrich Brangs 1897 Patent Multi-Tool Scissors 

The scissors are marked "D.R. Patent, No 100450". "D.R." stands for "Deutschen Reiche" and the patent number corresponds to Friedrich Brangs' 1897 patent of a folding scissor pocket knife (patent document). "Patentirt im Deutschen Reiche vom 30. November 1897 ab."

References:
http://www.multi-tool.org/patents/DE100450A.pdf


Hoffritz Multi-Tool Pruner
 
 
The photos were generously provided to The Multi-Tool Museum by Michael E.

This multi-tool was made in England by Ibberson for Hoffritz (Hoffritz is the merchant brand). More than one factory manufactured multi-tools for Hoffritz and some examples are marked "Made in Germany". It contains folding shears and a pruning blade. Some also contain a saw. Similar multi-tools were sold by Luna, Bonsa, Voss Cut Co, and Edward Zinn. They were manufactured at least as early as the 1950's.

References:
Goins' Encyclopedia of Cutlery Markings, p. 130
Pocket Knives: The new compact study guide and identifier by Bernard Levine
1950's Voss Cut Co catalog reprint by Joe Dennard



German Cigar Cutter Knife
The photos were generously provided to The Multi-Tool Museum by G.L. of New Jersey.

"Second Panel Sheriffs Jury January 1896"




S Mordan & Co Ivory Folding Rule
The photos were generously provided to The Multi-Tool Museum by G.L. of New Jersey.

Ivory rule with retractable knife blade and pencil.



Retractable Pen/Pencil and Multi-Blade Knife
The photos were generously provided to The Multi-Tool Museum by G.L. of New Jersey.


Multi-Blade Knife w/ Pencil 

The photos were generously provided to The Multi-Tool Museum by G.L. of New Jersey.



Eloi "5-Franc Coin Knife" 


The photos were generously provided to The Multi-Tool Museum by G.L. of New Jersey. The ad was scanned from a 1960s Hoffritz Catalog. The manufacturer of the Hoffritz coin knife is not specified in the catalog.

http://www.eloi.net/coinknives.html



100-blade "Collector's Knife"

  
The ad was scanned from a 1960s Hoffritz Catalog. The ad from Popular Science January 1957 was digitized by Google Books. 



Tool Kit Knives
  
Ad from Hardware dealers' magazine, Volume 24 (1905) digitized by Google Books



Hoffritz German Tool Kit

Scanned from a 1960s Hoffritz catalog.



Harp Tool
The photo was generously provided to The Multi-Tool Museum by D Ludwick.

Ad from Illustrated World Volume 27 (1917) digitized by Google Books.



Screwdriver Knife

Ad from Popular Mechanics December 1938 digitized by Google Books.



Mercator K55K Sportsman's Knife

  

c1920s - 1950s 

References:
1920s and 1950's catalog pages from Worldknives.com.
YouTube video from Worldknives.com, showing the manufacture of the Mercator K55K knife in the Otter-Messer shop in Solingen, Germany.
Levine's Guide to Knives and their Values 4th Edition, p. 269, 308


German Multi-Tool Hammer


"If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail" --Bernard Baruch
...but what if your hammer has a file, a screwdriver, a knife, a gimlet, and an awl???

This vintage hammer multi-tool was made in Solingen Germany but it doesn't appear to have a maker's mark. The wood handle is 4 3/4" long. The overall length of the hammer is 6 5/8" so it may look a bit silly on a tool belt.



Klein Multi-Tool Crate Opener




Multi-Tool Caliper 

  

Stainless steel, Made in Italy
Patent 68608



Scout Knife

 
Ad from Boys' Life December 1924 digitized by Google Books.





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