Leatherman Super Tool 300 Photos

The days are getting shorter but I had a few minutes of light after work to enjoy the beautiful weather outside and test out the new Leatherman Super Tool 300.  That's right the Super Tool is back!  Here are some photos:

 

The Handy Man Club of America covered its release at the 2009 National Hardware Show.   Check out their video:


Comparison of the Super Tool 300 and it's predecessors.

(From left to right: Super Tool, Super Tool 200, Core, Super Tool 300)
Super Tool (1994):
(1) Larger, stronger multi-tool (in comparison to the PST)
(2) Unique locking mechanism
Super Tool 200 (2001): 
(1) Sliding locking mechanism
(2) Rolled handles
(3) Sheepsfoot serrated blade
Core (2005)
(1) Stronger pliers
(2) Stranded wire cutter
(3) Easy-to-use locks
(4) Longer blades and tools
(5) Hollow-ground screwdrivers in standard sizes
(6) Rolled handles with Zytel/metal construction
Super Tool 300 (2009)
(1) Stronger pliers
(2) 154CM removable wire cutters
(3) Larger handle cut outs and nail nicks for easier knife access
(4) "Edge-safety clumping"
(5) Stronger locks
(6) Rolled metal handles


The Super Tool 300 contains a selection of tools that's very similar to the Core and earlier versions of the Super Tool (Link to Comparison Tables).  Most of the changes are in the design.

The Super Tool 300 has a removable/replaceable wire cutter that's made from 154CM steel.  It's tough as nails!  No, I didn't free the chickens.  :)

Comparison of the pliers and wire cutters on the Super Tool 300 and the SOG PowerAssist.  

Comparison of the blades and locking mechanism on the Super Tool 300 and its predecessors.  

Both the plain edge and serrated knives are similar to those on the Core except that the knives on the Super Tool 300 have larger nail nicks.  There are also larger cutouts in the handles to provide easier access.  These features are especially helpful when opening the knives with work gloves.  Leatherman has also implemented something that it calls "Edge-safety clumping".  Basically, all the tools clump together except the blades open independently to minimize the possibility of injury.  The locking mechanism is also improved and its a bit sturdier than the lock on the Core.


Timber!  :)

   

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